Saturday, May 30, 2020

Amazon to Ban Incentivized Reviews

Must read

Tune to Merge with Cake Software in Major Purchase

Publicly-traded Toronto-based company Constellation Software has announced the acquisition of Seattle SaaS company Tune. Founded 11 years ago, Tune...

Why You Must Have Affiliate Program Audits

Whether you’ve been running an affiliate program for 10 years, or 10 months, regular auditing is an essential aspect of maintaining a successful affiliate...

Payment Processor and Executive to Pay Millions to Settle FTC Allegations of Assisting in Fraudulent Schemes and Credit Card Laundering

According to the Federal Trade Commission, one of the world’s leading payment processing companies and its former executive will pay more than...

Feds Go After Israeli Crypto Marketing Scam

Tal Valariola and Itay Barak of Digital Platinum Limited for aiding the United States-based firm All In Publishing Charged.
Pesach Lattin
Pesach Lattinhttp://pacevegas.com
Pesach "Pace" Lattin is one of the top experts in interactive advertising, affiliate marketing. Pace Lattin is known for his dedication to ethics in marketing, and focus on compliance and fraud in the industry, and has written numerous articles for publications from MediaPost, ClickZ, ADOTAS and his own blogs.

Amazon has been fighting back against ‘fake’ reviews on products for years now, even filing lawsuits against individuals and companies that use or create fake reviews.  They had gotten to the point where the vast majority of reviews are written by people who have actually used the products (or those who are making ‘compilation reviews’), but it seems that isn’t enough. Amazon is now making it against their rules to do incentivized reviews, except through their Amazon Vine program.

Incentivized reviews are when a company provides their product to a person so that they can use it and then provide a review.  This type of thing has been done by companies for a very long time, and for certain types of products it can be very effective. Prior to this rule change, incentivized reviews were allowed, but only if the reviewer disclosed that they got the product for free or with a discount.

Amazon commented on the change saying that these reviews, “make up only a tiny fraction of the tens of millions of reviews on Amazon, and when done carefully, they can be helpful to customers by providing a foundation of reviews for new or less well-known products.”

So with that comment, why are they banning them?

The answer likely lies with Amazon’s Vine program, which was launched back in 2007.  This program allows publishers and manufacturers to gain access to reviews from independent users for their products.  The company can send out products to the individuals, but they can have no further interaction with the reviewers.  Amazon seems to think that this helps to ensure the reviews are honest and not influenced in a way that makes the review unreliable.

Of course, this is a paid program, so Amazon will also be making more money by funneling people toward this program.

- Advertisement -

More articles

What's your opinion?

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Tune to Merge with Cake Software in Major Purchase

Publicly-traded Toronto-based company Constellation Software has announced the acquisition of Seattle SaaS company Tune. Founded 11 years ago, Tune...

Why You Must Have Affiliate Program Audits

Whether you’ve been running an affiliate program for 10 years, or 10 months, regular auditing is an essential aspect of maintaining a successful affiliate...

Payment Processor and Executive to Pay Millions to Settle FTC Allegations of Assisting in Fraudulent Schemes and Credit Card Laundering

According to the Federal Trade Commission, one of the world’s leading payment processing companies and its former executive will pay more than...

Feds Go After Israeli Crypto Marketing Scam

Tal Valariola and Itay Barak of Digital Platinum Limited for aiding the United States-based firm All In Publishing Charged.

How to Win Affiliate Marketing During Covid19

As Covid-19 disrupts “business as usual” and impacts consumer behavior around the world, companies of all shapes and sizes are discovering they...