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Google Testing New Article Method that Will Change Everything?

Dr. Peter Meyers, Moz’s marketing scientist, recently noticed something interesting from Google.  They seem to be testing new types of search results which they are calling “in-depth articles”.  In the example Meyers provided he did a search for “Mexican Food” on Google.  The results showed the normal local search results, followed a new section titled ‘in-depth articles’.  These articles were from places like The Wall Street Journal, the New York Times and Reason.com.  The articles were detailed restaurant reviews from these high quality publications.

While Google is always testing new things, this one seems to fit right in with their long term focus on providing search results which people will be more interested in.  Google has long said that high quality content is one factor which is becoming more important for their rankings, and this may just be the latest in a long series of changes on Google’s end to increase this importance.

How this new feature will be implemented will be something very important for marketers to follow over the coming weeks and months.  Whether these types of articles will only be displayed from well known sites like the New York Times or if regular sites which produce high quality content will also qualify is one of the big questions.

If results from all websites are included, Google will need the ability to not only see the length of an article, but also the overall value in order to make this a useful feature for searchers.  There are many different approaches that Google could take with this, but they all point to the fact that they are becoming more and more demanding of website owners to have great content on their sites.

The original findings of Dr. Peter Meyers were published on Search Engine Land.

What are you doing to improve the overall content of your web pages?  Do you think Google will roll out these in-depth article results across all their searches?  If so, what affect will that have on SEO?

About Michael Levanduski

Michael Levanduski is the assistant editor of Performance Marketing Insider, and an experienced freelance writer. He writes content for a wide range of sites in virtually every niche, though he specializes in technical writing as well as creating content for the performance and internet marketing industry. Michael was born in Grand Rapids, MI where he still lives with his wife and three children.

5 comments

  1. Google,as always testing everything …to force people to use AdWords :) , unfortunately !

  2. Clever. It may sooth publishers of quality content. It will be interesting to see what kind of mutually beneficial business model Google will come up with (or provide a strong rationale for publishers to go in a certain direction…).By making the selection for us, it becomes somewhat \\\”preferred treatment\\\”, so there must be good reasons for doing so. It may drive more quality content by quality publishers based on popular search results. And it may be detrimental to EHow and others.

  3. How can new websites compete with the giants when google favors “high authority” websites? Some Goliaths are even copying contents from little Davids..

  4. If they should implement this, big and famous sites are likely to be favoured. But it will be good if Google finds a way of crediting quality content from the small guys.

    I am currently doing a complete overhaul of my site to improve the quality. It’s not easy.

  5. What about those big, credible publishers who dissect their articles into smaller chunks (to force the user into loading another page…for ad revenue of course)? Are they then going to overhaul their websites just so that they can appear in the SERP’s if this test becomes a reality? I don’t think so. I think they will successfully lobby Google, and this test will fade into the background as a nothing but a small lesson learnt.

What's your opinion?

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