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Mitt Romney Investigated by FTC for False Advertising

Mitt Romney Investigated by FTC for False Advertising

The FTC announced today it was launching a lawsuit against Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney for Deceptive Advertising. After a several week investigation they concluded that some statements made by Romney’s campaign constituted false and deceptive advertising practices, and more importantly, were fraudulent as they did not provide proof or actual studies to back up the claims.

Wait is this true? Of course not!

The FTC is not investigating Romney for deceptive advertising anymore than they require diet companies to prove absolutely without a doubt that their claims are true.

Oh, you say? Diet companies are required to prove their claims, but Presidential Candidates can spout any bull-crap they want?

Let’s not forget: Mitt Romney is a politician, and a damn good one. He was the Governor of Massachusettes, the most liberal state in the Union, and supported many, many liberal ideas from gun-control, to gay rights, to heavy taxes on the rich. Now running as President, he claiming he never supported those things, and is taking a different stance in order to try to win the race. Let’s at least be honest here: he’s lying to win the Whitehouse, but so do most people running for office.

So why isn’t he being charged by the FTC, along with dozens of politicians a week for deceptive advertising? They are clearly breaking the law, since the law prohibits deceptive advertising, right?

I’m not saying let’s actually go after Mitt Romney and other politicians but instead asking that we honestly examine why exactly the FTC is going after affiliate marketing companies and not Governor Mittens.

What about what large brands say about themselves, shouldn’t they be sued by the FTC?

Campbell’s claims their soups were “MMmm MMMmmm Good.” I personally think that they are basically “Umm..umm.. crap?” Have they proved that their soups were really good, or that most consumers think they are good? Doubtful. 9 out 10 people who eat Campbell’s soup probably agree with me.

I’m not even sure ANYTHING from McDonalds should quality as food. I’m not really sure what is in a Chicken Nugget, but I know its not Chicken.

Turns out also, Nutella isn’t really good for you either. Really, you mean that a spreadable mix of fat and chocolate isn’t exactly the best thing to feed your kid? Did anyone REALLY think that it was good for them?

Clorox Wipes claim that they are “Tough Cleaning in a Thick Wipe.” It’s on their case; I know because there is one sitting on my desk right now. Is it really, “Tough Cleaning?” Can you prove its tough, and what is that compared to? Is it tougher than a MMA fighter with a case of towels and a blowtorch? Also, the scent claims to be “Lemon Fresh.” Really? Smells like formaldehyde to me.

As much as I would like to see McDonalds sued for claiming they actually serve food, I’m more looking to see the FTC start acting fair.

Seriously guys, I think by now the general public should know that Acai berries do nothing more than give you a bad case of diarrhea (and thus, in theory weight loss?) and that working from home stuffing envelopes will only give you a nasty paper cut.

There comes a time where people need to grow up and stop believing everything they read.

That is what this comes down to: is the FTC going to far in “protecting” consumers from things that should be obvious? Are Americans really so dumb that they cannot make decisions for themselves and should the government be there to ensure to be their mommy? What point is it too ridiculous? I understand that the guys at the FTC are doing their job, and I completely support their work… still shouldn’t we expect more from the general public?

What’s your opinion? Are we really that dumb as a society?



About Pace Lattin

Pace Lattin is one of the top experts in interactive advertising, affiliate marketing. Pace Lattin is known for his dedication to ethics in marketing, and focus on compliance and fraud in the industry, and has written numerous articles for publications from MediaPost, ClickZ, ADOTAS and his own blogs.
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